The collected works of mia - Page 8

I remember that one customer had a g-brick on o3k, but I can't remember why or which software was running; I think they were running some simulation of kinds, most likely nuclear or chemistry related. It was in 2004.

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:Onyx2:
cb88 wrote:
For what it is worth there is a xf86-video-sunleo driver nowadays on linux but I have no idea if it works. I I may get around too in in the next new months since I now have a large disk in my SS5.


well worth the wait!

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:Onyx2:
Keep us updated, this is great.
:Onyx2:
screenshots?
:Onyx2:
This makes me think, does this also mean that netbsd/openbsd and perhaps m68k linux can now work on winuae?
:Onyx2:
now that's great.
:Onyx2:
Hope SCO doesn't sue them, haha.

Oh man, that so makes me want to run X11R5 again.
:Onyx2:
could you recommend a great book/pdf to learn emacs' implementation of lisp? Or maybe better, sbcl or any other "advanced" clisp?

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:Onyx2:
has anyone managed to compile sbcl on irix?

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:Onyx2:
I've never really understood Lisp, probably because I've been using RPL for 20+ years and the fact that operators are placed prior to the operands confuses me. I understand Haskell much better though, subsequently I ask. Is there anything Lisp has to offer over other *reputable* functional languages such as Haskell?

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:Onyx2:
tvpaint?
:Onyx2:
so amiga~ish.
Good app though, works nicely and it's fast.
:Onyx2:
This is good old stuff.

TV_Paint36.zip
md5sum: 662fc6b2c6bf26938187d3689bd24a44

I imagine that's the one and only version for irix.
Barco Creator is also worth trying btw.
:Onyx2:
It was probably on AlphaNT.
A nice application, honestly, but really meant to be used with a tablet.
:Onyx2:
Don't waste your time with Freebsd on altix, it wouldn't work if you have more than one CPU enabled, and even so, it will crash now and then, and no one is really interested working on this.

Debian 6 will work; that's what I run on our altix cluster.

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:Onyx2:
I have one, I like it a lot.
:Onyx2:
I bought one deskside recently, in perfect condition, I paid $1500 cash, it came with two dual [email protected] with 4GB each + RM11 + GE + DG5-2. The trick is not the price, it's shipping; I bought it locally, and it was delivered by the seller for that price.

Why did I pay $1500 for this, well, some of our backup software still run on this platform, and the old one died, I blew up the midplane while inserting a XIO card a little too fast.
:Onyx2:
If you don't already have some altix-specific software to run on this, it's not worth it.
we use it for quicktransit.
:Onyx2:
If your intend is to bang your head on the wall porting code, then please do it on Irix, not Linux/IA64.
:Onyx2:
I have seen a train simulator on Onyx, I think it was used by some indian institution for training.
It was very smooth.
:Onyx2:
What I really like about the Onyx2 myself is that it's very quiet, assuming the room temperature isn't terribly high, otherwise it's loud, when the fans are engaged at maximum speed. But under normal conditions (and occasionally a little burst) it's rather quiet.

I have not looked into replacing those fans with even quiet(er) ones, should this be possible, anyone looked into this?
:Onyx2:
I remember precisely when I saw this train simulator I've mentioned above, it was at Imagina, the same year Intel came out with MMX additions to the Pentium line; and they were demoing "descent" in 320x240, next to the train simulator, which ran with multiple pipes.

Haha, it was a good laugh, like comparing a VT terminal to a playstation 4 game.
:Onyx2:
won't be as expensive as your electric bill.
:Onyx2:
about 225W per node btw.
:Onyx2:
that's a good one.
:Onyx2:
It has been 15 years today that I haven't used this old Multia; reason is simple, it broke back then.

Well it was about time to give it a new life, as such I managed to scavenge parts from other Multias to resurrect it. It is now in pristine condition: new skins, "new" scsi controller, batteries, ram (128MB), cables, harddrive and all; many people kindly sent me the missing parts as well, many thanks to them.

For the harddrive, I figured it would be better to use an external one, as the Multia is known to overheat (hence the vertical stand), so I reconditioned an old SUN 411 external scsi enclosure where I retrofitted a SSD (Kingston SSDNow 114P) in a ACard SATA-to-SCSI enclosure; I figured it would make it easier to backup/restore as well.

It was time for a new firmware, so I upgraded it to X4.5-819, in order to run OpenVMS, as such, I found an old Citizen 700mA floppy drive which needed a new drive belt; to my surprise, it wasn't that complicated to replace, then I upgraded the firmware, which I found on the Digital/Compaq freeware 5.0 cdrom for AXP.

After the firmware got updated, I removed anything unnecessary from the Multia, in order to have as much room as possible for the airflow, again, because the Multia is prone to overheat. Subsequently, it belongs now to my basement, which is around 16C at any time of the year. I removed the floppy drive, and internal harddrive.

Then it was time to install OpenVMS 7.3, for those familiar with the procedure, it is mostly unchanged on Multia, a few differences arose since the Multia was never officially capable to run OpenVMS (it was perhaps too "cheap", many people can comment on this). As such, I had to do a foreign boot from a floppy that had proper provisioning for the Multia; but then, everything installed properly. I installed Decnet phase IV (not decnet plus, nor galaxy/cluster support at this time) and TCP/IP, along with DW-MOTIF (Dec Motif) for CDE. Then performed an AUTOGEN.

Everything worked _perfectly_ since the first boot, including CDE. I then setup TCP/IP, enabling FTP/TELNET as clients and TELNET as server (will do SSH later, with Multinet), then added TCP/IP startup in SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM, as one is expected to do; and then backed up the SSD, should I want to restore things from there.

Snapshots below, enjoy!
:Onyx2:
I think Irix is great for workstations, not only because how Irix itself work, nor the fantastic tools it embeds (mipspro and the entire suite, notably) but also because of the hundreds of applications that make it so powerful. Flame, BarcoCreator, Mathematica, Alias/Wavefront apps, Vizserver, ProE and many many others, but also the ones nekochaners did a fantastic job porting.

Add to this that if you don't like Irix, you can still run OpenBSD, magicians like Miod did an amazing work on this front. I can't stress enough how Miod is a genius, and maybe he's so great because he doesn't think x86, he has a very widespread use of different systems and architectures and that's yet another reason why one should spend time using systems like SGI's.
:Onyx2:
that's really cool.
:Onyx2:
I hope it's not as bad to code with as motif.
:Onyx2:
keep us posted!
:Onyx2:
what box is this?
:Onyx2:
Even if this was possible, what would be the advantage of either an o300 or octane2 over an onyx2?
:Onyx2:
Okay, this is really nice, great work.
:Onyx2:
pure curiosity, how much does it cost in material only to print that? Assuming you get only one shot at this.
:Onyx2:
which printer did you use? this looks like a serious great job.
:Onyx2:
pm sent for the vaxstation.
:Onyx2:
now that's a nice machine, doesn't get much better than this.
:Onyx2:
I think 8GB is nice, but 2GB is enough for my needs (mipspro mostly). My main workstation has 2GB, and while I have the 6 other sticks in my drawer, I never had a need for them, I keep thinking I might need them someday, but realistically, I don't think so. There's only one application I'm compiling that requires a little over 1.5GB at compil time, most of the rest can be done around the 1GB bar. I think 2GB is plenty, but I don't want to discourage you from adding more of course, I just say, the gain is usually marginal unless you really have an application that needs it (in which case, name it, I'm curious to know which).

I thought about parallelizing the compilation further of course, and I did that, but I've noticed the gain is not worth the effort, it's cpu bound anyway.
:Onyx2:
Haha, I did give mad scientists names at some point to my workstations (tesla, einstein, bore, feyman, and all) but I gave up when I had too many computers. I moved to periodic table element names now, so at least I learn something.
:Onyx2:
most depressing thing I read today.
:Onyx2: